The energy industry is waging war against climate change, and winning.

In late August, the Environmental Partnership, a group of oil and gas firms dedicated to cutting greenhouse gas emissions, released its first annual progress report. The results are impressive and showcase what happens when an industry unites to further the public good.

The Environmental Partnership launched in late 2017 with 26 members. Within 12 months, it more than doubled in size to 58 members and includes 32 of America’s top 40 oil and gas producers. Today, its members account for nearly half of America’s oil and natural gas production.

The group focuses on cutting emissions of methane and other greenhouse gases known as “volatile organic compounds.” Without proper monitoring and maintenance, these gases can escape from drilling rigs and pipelines and contribute to global warming.

Even before the partnership formed, firms were spending millions to reduce their carbon footprints. Methane emissions have plummeted in America’s largest energy-rich basins, even as oil and gas production has spiked.

But firms in the Environmental Partnership sought to slash emissions even further.

First, the partnership focused on updating outdated technology like high-bleed pneumatic controllers. Pneumatic controllers regulate temperature, pressure and liquid levels at natural gas sites by opening or closing valves. To operate these valves, the controllers rely on pressurized natural gas. As their name suggests, high-bleed pneumatic controllers can release relatively large amounts of natural gas, along with methane and VOC byproducts, into the air.

The Environmental Partnership plans to replace all high-bleed pneumatic controllers in five years. And it’s well on its way to doing so. It replaced, retrofitted or removed more than 28,000 prior to 2018 and an additional 3,000 last year. As a result, nearly 40 participating firms don’t use high-bleed controllers at all.

Second, the partnership set out to curb methane leaks, which can sometimes happen as firms extract, store and burn natural gas. Methane is both a potent greenhouse gas and the main ingredient in natural gas. Participating companies conducted more than 156,000 surveys across 78,000 production sites, inspecting more than 56 million individual parts.

After its thorough inspections and repairs, the Environmental Partnership found that just 0.16 percent of industry parts contained leaks and member firms repaired 99 percent of those in 60 days or less.

Participating firms also worked to better monitor liquid removal from natural gas wells. When too much liquid, mostly consisting of water, builds up within gas wells, firms manually direct the liquid to vents that bring it to surface. During that process, methane or volatile organic compounds can potentially escape into the atmosphere.

Over the course of 2018, the Environmental Partnership oversaw more than 130,000 manual removals to ensure environmentally safe execution.

Methane emissions from natural gas systems fell over 14 percent between 1990 and 2017. The Environmental Partnership’s initiatives aim to cut these emissions even further. According to the EPA’s own estimates, reducing methane leaks and replacing high-bleed controllers can slash emissions by 40 and 60 percent, respectively.

Energy firms are weaponizing their data and tools for the common good. Let’s hope they keep up the fight in the war against climate change.

This column was originally published at Explore Big Sky.

The views expressed in CCNS member articles are not necessarily the views or positions of the entire CCNS. They are the views of the authors, who are members of the CCNS.

© 2019. All rights reserved.

© 2019. All rights reserved.